September 4, 2009, Newsletter Issue #67: Legalities Associated with Kitchen Remodeling

Tip of the Week

When you hire a kitchen designer to remodel you kitchen, you are entering into a legal agreement. That means you could end up in court if something goes terribly wrong. That's why it's essential to understand some basic legal issues associated with remodeling before you hire someone. Did you know that, after you have such a remodeling agreement, you have the Right of Rescission? That means you can change your mind within a certain time period. In other words, if you have second thoughts, you are protected. When you interview a potential architect or kitchen designer, ask them how they handle certain legal issues.

Your contractor should agree to obtain any and all permits needed for the work. If a firm asked you to do this, choose another. Your contractor should take on the burden for tracking down incomplete or damaged orders. Your contractor should be willing to put, in writing, any change orders that occur when the project is underway. You may decide that you don't like a particular choice you made once you see how the project is progressing. Finally, if a project isn't handled properly you could be responsible to pay any subcontractor hired on the job. These are people a contractor hires to complete a specific task. Make sure your contractor is willing to give you an affidavit that all subs have been paid. You should also sign a waiver of lien, which releases you from any liability for subs and manufacturers. If the firm you are planning to hire doesn't agree to these terms, find another.

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